We should see color. We should see religion. We should see homosexuality. We should see gender identity. We should see all the things that make people and the world different and not pretend that we are colorblind or that one story is enough to represent a whole group of people.

But we should also remember that most people have the same kinds of feelings and wants. Everyone wants to be the hero sometimes.

Author Sara Farizan, “Everyone Wants To Be the Hero Sometimes” (CBC Diversity)

(Source: diversityinya)

  • Posted 1 hour ago
  • October 1st, 2014

8753 Likes & Reblogs

There are so many ways female writers are talked about that male writers never will be. We are still reviewing people and not their work. We are still marginalizing people in these subtle ways, where it’s like, ‘Oh I just don’t like that genre,’ or ‘Oh, that book’s just for fun, there’s nothing important there.’

Rachel Fershleiser, head of all things books at Tumblr, on using her megaphone to promote female writers. Listen to the full interview here, or download it at iTunes or Stitcher. (via firstdraftwithsarahenni)

Yeah, I probably said that.

(via rachelfershleiser)

(via rachelfershleiser)

  • Posted 5 days ago
  • September 25th, 2014

92 Likes & Reblogs

nprbooks:

In honor of Banned Books Week, here are the top 10 challenged books of 2013.

This is the second year Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series has topped the list. He tells NPR’s Lynn Neary:

"I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian, but I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them."

  • Posted 6 days ago
  • September 24th, 2014

430 Likes & Reblogs

litrant:

The Witch’s Boy by Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin Young Readers, $16.95).
This lovely cross between a fable and an action-adventure tale falls into that category known as “chapter books,” the sort of book that kids aged nine to 13 are often expected to read—and just as often grouse about. 
Don’t expect much grousing about this one, though.
Ned and his identical twin, Tam, are playing in the Great River one day when something terrible happens. Tam drowns, and Ned almost dies as well; his mother, known as Sister Witch in their village for her way with herbs, healing, and the only magic left in the world, saves him by stitching his twin’s soul to his chest. 
But, as we all know, the thing about magic is that it’s dangerous and has consequences.
In another part of the world, Áine is a young girl living with her parents. When her mother dies, her father also nearly dies from grief. Finally jolted back into life, he takes Áine into the woods, where he takes up a life of banditry, eventually becoming the Bandit King. 
And eventually, he decides to go after Ned’s mother’s magic while she’s gone out of town, leaving Ned to protect it.
This is a very well-developed story in the classical style of fairy tales, but with a tone that includes younger readers as “in-the-know.” They will find much to like about Ned, who struggles to recover from the loss of his twin (and the sense that “the wrong boy” lived, which is shared by the townspeople and perhaps even his father), and in Áine, who is a smart and brave girl. 
All the characters are fully realized, with a strong narrative laid over the bones of traditional story-telling—which has, of course, become traditional story-telling because it works so well to hold our attention.
Keep this in mind for readers who are yet too young for Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials series; it will be a good addition to the earlier Harry Potter books for the too-young-for-YA readers.

litrant:

The Witch’s Boy by Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin Young Readers, $16.95).

This lovely cross between a fable and an action-adventure tale falls into that category known as “chapter books,” the sort of book that kids aged nine to 13 are often expected to read—and just as often grouse about.

Don’t expect much grousing about this one, though.

Ned and his identical twin, Tam, are playing in the Great River one day when something terrible happens. Tam drowns, and Ned almost dies as well; his mother, known as Sister Witch in their village for her way with herbs, healing, and the only magic left in the world, saves him by stitching his twin’s soul to his chest.

But, as we all know, the thing about magic is that it’s dangerous and has consequences.

In another part of the world, Áine is a young girl living with her parents. When her mother dies, her father also nearly dies from grief. Finally jolted back into life, he takes Áine into the woods, where he takes up a life of banditry, eventually becoming the Bandit King. 

And eventually, he decides to go after Ned’s mother’s magic while she’s gone out of town, leaving Ned to protect it.

This is a very well-developed story in the classical style of fairy tales, but with a tone that includes younger readers as “in-the-know.” They will find much to like about Ned, who struggles to recover from the loss of his twin (and the sense that “the wrong boy” lived, which is shared by the townspeople and perhaps even his father), and in Áine, who is a smart and brave girl.

All the characters are fully realized, with a strong narrative laid over the bones of traditional story-telling—which has, of course, become traditional story-telling because it works so well to hold our attention.

Keep this in mind for readers who are yet too young for Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials series; it will be a good addition to the earlier Harry Potter books for the too-young-for-YA readers.

Book Review: JACKABY