Today is a big day here at Algonquin Young Readers: we’re having (ok, publishing) twins! Today is publication day for both Kelly Barnhill’s THE WITCH’S BOY and for William Ritter’s JACKABY. To celebrate our bundles of joy, we’re having a publication day giveaway. Click here for a chance to win signed copies of the books and some super cute frog pins

Today is a big day here at Algonquin Young Readers: we’re having (ok, publishing) twins! Today is publication day for both Kelly Barnhill’s THE WITCH’S BOY and for William Ritter’s JACKABY. To celebrate our bundles of joy, we’re having a publication day giveaway. Click here for a chance to win signed copies of the books and some super cute frog pins

From 10 Random Things about Will Ritter on Jessabella Reads…

4) The only class I ever failed while at university was Juggling. I did, however, earn full marks in Trampoline.
 
5) I returned for my masters program and earned a 4.02 GPA as a graduate student. (Take that, Juggling.)
Last week’s Shelf Awareness included the second book in the Three-Ring Rascals series, The Greatest Star on Earth, in their roundup of Indie Favorites with a blurb from Chris Rose at The Spirit of ’76 Bookstore:"… The perfect blend of gentle drama and humor and plenty of appealing art make The Greatest Star on Earth another winner in a terrific series!”

Last week’s Shelf Awareness included the second book in the Three-Ring Rascals series, The Greatest Star on Earth, in their roundup of Indie Favorites with a blurb from Chris Rose at The Spirit of ’76 Bookstore:
"… The perfect blend of gentle drama and humor and plenty of appealing art make The Greatest Star on Earth another winner in a terrific series!”

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KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.

My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.

It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.

 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  • Posted 5 days ago
  • September 12th, 2014

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"Pockets! I was thrilled. I have never understood the aversion to pockets in ladies fashion—as though it has become some great shame to appear as if one might actually need to posses anything."One of the innumerable wonderful parts of William Ritter’s Jackaby is his descriptions of Abigail Rook’s clothing.  We think this looks like something she might’ve liked to wear while sleuthing with Jackaby in New Fiddleham in 1892.  What do you think? Image via Metmuseum.org.

"Pockets! I was thrilled. I have never understood the aversion to pockets in ladies fashion—as though it has become some great shame to appear as if one might actually need to posses anything."

One of the innumerable wonderful parts of William Ritter’s Jackaby is his descriptions of Abigail Rook’s clothing.  We think this looks like something she might’ve liked to wear while sleuthing with Jackaby in New Fiddleham in 1892.  What do you think?

Image via Metmuseum.org.